IT and Project Management Case Studies

National Instruments Migrates 165K Content Items from Jive to Microsoft 365

National Instruments Migrates 165K Content Items from Jive to Microsoft 365

Client Profile

National Instruments is an American multinational company that produces automated test equipment and virtual instrumentation software. It is headquartered in Austin, Texas and its operations span internationally.

Situation

National Instruments wanted to move select Jive places and related content to their Microsoft 365 tenant.

Solution

Partnered with the client to rationalize Jive content to be migrated; utilized ThreeWill’s Jive to SharePoint migration utilities to extract, transform and load the selected content (~165,000 items) within Jive to SharePoint online.

Business Benefits

  • Project supported National Instrument’s overall strategy to move toward one content management system and eliminate Jive licensing costs.
  • Implemented a solution that:
    • ​Maintained a flat content structure – e.g. no subsites – as recommended by Microsoft,
    • Utilized Microsoft’s Modern sites format versus Classic, and
    • Utilized out-of-the-box Microsoft 365 capabilities, versus implementing custom functionality that would increase ongoing maintenance costs
Migration Before Jive Contract Expiration

Multinational Manufacturer moves from Jive to Microsoft 365

Client Profile

This company is an American multinational manufacturer and marketer of chemical products for consumers and industrial customers such as BMW, GE, Chevron, and Procter & Gamble.

Situation

As part of the efforts to move to the Microsoft cloud, the client wanted to migrate selected Jive content to SharePoint online before their Jive contract expired.

Solution

ThreeWill leveraged it’s Jive to SharePoint Migration Utilities and Agile Migration process to migrate critical Jive content to Microsoft 365 before the expiration of the Jive licenses.

Business Benefits

  • They were able to save on the annual cost of Jive licensing while moving to a communication and collaboration platform within Microsoft’s cloud-based services – e.g. SharePoint Online, Microsoft Teams, and OneDrive for Business.
JCDecaux Logo Outside

JC Decaux Jive to Microsoft Migration

Client Profile

JCDecaux’s network of outdoor advertising displays is one of the largest in the global media industry. Every day, JCDecaux reaches more than 410 million people on the planet.  As audiences and communication channels become more fragmented, JCDecaux stands out for its ability to combine mass media and targeted solutions. JCDecaux owes its distinctiveness to its presence in cities, transport systems, and major thoroughfares. With the global population becoming increasingly urban and mobile, their solutions become more effective with each passing year. They are now one of the most influential media networks on the global level, and one of the most flexible on the local level.  To learn more about JCDecaux, visit www.jcdecaux.com.

Situation

JCDecaux needed to migrate to a new Intranet platform in an effort to increase platform stability, drive user engagement and cut costs while migrating core content from the original platform.

Solution

Microsoft 365/SharePoint online-based intranet solution that included custom site templates with metadata content tagging and categorization to support flexible content curation strategy.

Business Benefits

  • Intranet content was refreshed and existing content retired based on key criteria, including content aging
  • Provided a viable intranet strategy built on O365/SharePoint that leveraged existing Microsoft licensing and related cost reductions
  • Intranet positioned on a modern/continuously updated platform
  • Full coverage of 10,000 user community​


Information Technology

Information technology (IT) is the application of computers and telecommunications equipment to store, retrieve, transmit and manipulate data, often in the context of a business or other enterprise.

The term is commonly used as a synonym for computers and computer networks, but it also encompasses other information distribution technologies such as television and telephones. Several industries are associated with information technology, including computer hardware, software, electronics, semiconductors, internet, telecom equipment, engineering, healthcare, e-commerce and computer services.

Humans have been storing, retrieving, manipulating and communicating information since the Sumerians in Mesopotamia developed writing in about 3000 BC, but the term information technology in its modern sense first appeared in a 1958 article published in the Harvard Business Review; authors Harold J. Leavitt and Thomas L. Whisler commented that “the new technology does not yet have a single established name. We shall call it information technology (IT).” Their definition consists of three categories: techniques for processing, the application of statistical and mathematical methods to decision-making, and the simulation of higher-order thinking through computer programs.

Based on the storage and processing technologies employed, it is possible to distinguish four distinct phases of IT development: pre-mechanical (3000 BC – 1450 AD), mechanical (1450–1840), electromechanical (1840–1940) and electronic (1940–present).[5] This article focuses on the most recent period (electronic), which began in about 1940.

Project Management

Project management is the discipline of carefully projecting or planning, organizing, motivating and controlling resources to achieve specific goals and meet specific success criteria. A project is a temporary endeavor designed to produce a unique product, service or result with a defined beginning and end (usually time-constrained, and often constrained by funding or deliverables) undertaken to meet unique goals and objectives, typically to bring about beneficial change or added value. The temporary nature of projects stands in contrast with business as usual (or operations), which are repetitive, permanent, or semi-permanent functional activities to produce products or services. In practice, the management of these two systems is often quite different, and as such requires the development of distinct technical skills and management strategies.

The primary challenge of project management is to achieve all of the project goals and objectives while honoring the preconceived constraints. The primary constraints are scope, time, quality and budget. The secondary — and more ambitious — challenge is to optimize the allocation of necessary inputs and integrate them to meet pre-defined objectives.

Danny RyanIT and Project Management